Researcher Database

Name Location

Barry Adam

adam@uwindsor.ca
401 Sunset Avenue
Windsor, Ontario
416-642-6486 x2
http://www.uwindsor.ca/adam
University of Windsor
Secondary Affiliation: Ontario HIV Treatment Network
Distinguished University Professor
Sociology
Department: Sociology, Anthropology and Criminology

Languages:

  • English
  • French
  • Spanish

Communities:

  • Gay men
  • Racialized Communities/Communities of Colour
  • Trans men

Expertise:

  • Community-based or Participatory/Action research
  • Interviews
  • Qualitative data analysis
  • Research proposal development
  • Research synthesis

Topic:

  • Discrimination
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Race/Racism/Racialization
  • Sexuality
  • Trans health

Available to Mentor:

  • Community-based researchers
  • Doctoral students
  • Masters students
  • New researchers
  • Undergraduate students

Current Interest in LGBTQ Research

Dr. Adam has an extensive record of working towards gay and bisexual men’s sexual health alongside a wide range of community and academic partners. Specifically, he has sought to apply principles of community-based research into work on HIV prevention and issues of living with HIV. Previously, he focused on gay and lesbian movements, documenting how individual coping strategies can coalesce into collective mobilization and a transformative politics that restructures or revolutionizes the conditions of subordination.

Experience with LGBTQ Research

Dr. Adam has an extensive record of working towards gay and bisexual men’s sexual health alongside a wide range of community and academic partners. Specifically, he has sought to apply principles of community-based research into work on HIV prevention and issues of living with HIV. Previously, he focused on gay and lesbian movements, documenting how individual coping strategies can coalesce into collective mobilization and a transformative politics that restructures or revolutionizes the conditions of subordination.

Current Projects

Gay Poz Sex – a collaboration with Trevor Hart and the Poz Prevention Working Group of the Gay Men’s Sexual Health Alliance, GPS is a sexual health and HIV prevention intervention founded on the principles of motivational interviewing. Now running for several years, this intervention is hosted by the AIDS Committee of Toronto and Positive Living BC and is being adapted for use in Quebec and Colombia.

Mano en Mano/Chicosnet – A collaboration with Gerardo Betancourt and the Centre for Spanish Speaking Peoples, this project is an intervention to reduce vulnerabilities of Latino newcomers. Mano en Mano was followed by ¡Cuéntame! Conta-me! the first study of Spanish and Portuguese-speaking gay and bisexual men in Canada.

Pathways to Resiliency - Pathways to Resiliency, a project with Asian Community AIDS Services, is an exploratory study on strength based approaches to HIV prevention and health promotion strategies among east and southeast Asian MSM.

Community-Based Research Partners

Gay Men’s Sexual Health Alliance
Gay Poz Sex
http://www.gmsh.ca

Centre for Spanish Speaking Peoples
Mano en mano/Chicosnet
http://www.spanishservices.org/en/

Asian Community AIDS Services
Pathways to Resiliency
http://www.acas.org

Key Publications

Barry D Adam, Patrice Corriveau, Richard Elliott, Jason Globerman, Ken English, and Sean Rourke. 2014. “HIV disclosure as practice and public policy” Critical Public Health http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09581596.2014.980395

J Cristian Rangel and Barry D Adam.  2014.  “Everyday moral reasoning in the governmentality of HIV risk” Sociology of Health and Illness 36 (1): 60-74.

Barry D Adam, Richard Elliott, Patrice Corriveau, and Ken English. 2014. “Impacts of criminalization on the everyday lives of people living in with HIV in Canada” Sexuality Research and Social Policy 11:39-49.

Barry D Adam. 2011. “Epistemic fault lines in biomedical and social approaches to HIV prevention” Journal of the International AIDS Society 14 (Supplement 2):S2.

Barry D Adam, James Murray, Suzanne Ross, Jason Oliver, Stephen G Lincoln, and Vicki Rynard. 2011. “Hivstigma.­com, an innovative web-supported stigma-reduction intervention for gay and bisexual men” Health Education Research 26 (5):795-807.